Phase Inspection Process

There are three opportunities available during the building cycle that are recommended to have your third-party inspector evaluate and report on the workmanship and construction of your new home. The standard 3 phase inspection process is utilized to ensure that major construction defects within your home are not covered up.

There is a market for these types of inspections for a reason. Additionally, most high-quality home builders fully welcome a third-party inspection. The new construction phase inspection is conducted at three separate times;

  1. The first inspection should be conducted prior to your concrete being poured (Pre-pour Inspection)

  2. The second inspection takes place prior to the interior walls and insulation being installed (Framing Inspection)

  3. The final inspection takes place after the home is complete, usually around the time of your initial “Blue tape” walk-through (Final Inspection).

Pre-pour Foundation Inspection

Concrete foundation (Pre-pour) Inspections

There is ample value in having your home’s foundation inspected prior to the pour day. If you are considering having your foundation inspected there are a few things you should plan for. Failure to install your home’s foundation in accordance with the engineered plans can have a devastating impact on the integrity of your home’s foundation. Furthermore, there are numerous workmanship defects that are present on nearly every foundation that can impact the visible appearance as well as the bearing capacity of the foundation. Once the concrete is poured, the opportunity to have your foundation inspected is gone.

When to Schedule the Foundation Inspection

It takes time to coordinate with concrete companies for the required concrete for your foundation. That means, your builder knows a few days in advance when they plan of pouring. The best time for the pre-pour inspection is typically two days prior to the actual pour day. This will help ensure that the foundation is ready to inspect, as well as give the builder sufficient enough time to make any and all needed corrections, or postpone the pour day. Additionally, this will allow you some time to re-inspect the repairs prior to pour day.

Upon completion of the on-site inspection, we will return to the office and begin constructing your digital report. The report will be comprised of digital photographs and locations of each defect, as well as the relevant references for issues discovered during the inspection. This helps ensure that once your builder has the report, the required corrections are implemented.

Framing Inspection

Shedding light on your new home inspection

The next phase of the inspection process is typically called the framing inspection, or pre-cover inspection. Once your home’s roofing material, exterior cladding, and windows have been installed, your home will be ready for the interior sheetrock and insulation to begin.

Because the sheetrock and insulation cover some of the critical materials, like window flashing, electrical wiring, and your home’s framing components, having your third-party inspector evaluate and report on the quality of work is paramount. Once the sheetrock goes up it is too late. Many defects can lay dormant until well after the home warranty has expired, leaving the home owner responsible for any needed repairs.

Final Inspection

The final inspection should be scheduled a few days before your scheduled walk-through with your builder. This will ensure that the building process is near completion so systems can be inspected. This inspection incorporates all the major systems in the home and is the most time consuming of the 3 phases.

We truly appreciate you taking the time to consider Clear Path Inspections LLC as your home inspector, and we look forward to assisting you with your new home inspection needs.

Things You Can Do When Hiring Your Personal Inspector

New construction phase inspections can be tricky to schedule. If your project manager is off by a few days on his timeline, or last minute paperwork needs to be submitted, your scheduled inspection could be missed. That is why it is important to let your home building representatives know in advance that you wish to hire an independent building inspector to perform phase inspections throughout the building process. 

It’s best to have a licensed home inspector inspect a new home during early phases of construction when more of the house is visible. But, if the house is almost complete when you decide to buy it, it’s still important to get a home inspection on a new home. The walk-through with the builder is not enough. You need a professional looking out for you.

5 Reasons to Get a Home Inspection on a New Home

There are important reasons why new home buyers should always get a home inspection on a new home before purchasing.

1.  New construction homes have all sorts of problems. Building a home is a complex orchestration involving many different subcontractors and their employees each working on a different system of the house usually without regard to the other house systems. With all the separate activities occurring at the same time, it is nearly impossible for the builder to carefully check all phases of construction. Even the best builders will likely miss something. 

2.  Municipal building inspections are not the same as home inspections. The job of municipal building inspectors is to check for compliance with applicable building codes. Building codes are minimum standards. While most municipal building inspectors are doing their best, factors beyond their control prevent these inspections from being enough.

3.  Problems found before you buy can be fixed before moving in to your new home. You won’t have to deal with the dust and noise from repairs, or the inconvenience of having to stay home from work while workers are in your house. While there will likely be some minor touch-ups that will need to take place after you move in, you will want the builder to fix any significant repairs right away.

4.  Defects can be repaired before they result in serious consequences or costly damage. Safety items such as gas leaks need to be addressed to protect you and your family. Missing attic insulation that will result in higher utility bills can be installed. Raised shingles which can lead to rotted roof sheathing can be repaired before purchasing your new home.

5.  It matters at resale. When you decide to sell your formerly new home, the buyer will likely get a home inspection. Deficiencies that date back to the original construction will be discovered even if you never knew they existed. At this point, it’s too late to get the builder involved. You now own those problems.

The Good News is that hiring a professional licensed home inspector to inspect your new dream home can pay for itself many times over both monetarily and with peace of mind. You can feel confident that problems are identified and corrected early before you buy your home.